Hey Clyde, what’s up with the ASU crane flag?

July 23rd, 2015 by Ben

ASU Flag smallerOne DJC reader became disgruntled after spotting an Arizona State University flag flying high atop a crane in South Lake Union at what appears to be a Holland Partner Group jobsite.

CEO Clyde Holland isn’t an ASU grad, as far I as know. So, what’s up with the Sun Devil flag? Did you lose a bet Clyde?

Maybe someone at Morrow, the crane operator, snuck it up there.

Don’t they know that this is purple and gold territory? Arizona isn’t even a Pacific coast state.

The reader described the flag as “utterly appalling.”

I had to talk him out of ascending the crane with his GoPro strapped on to remove the offending matter — didn’t want him to get hurt.

Millennial madness arrives in Seattle

June 25th, 2015 by Ben

Alley111Image courtesy of Blanton Turner

 

Catering to millennials seems to be an emerging theme for many developers in the Seattle area.
Kilroy Realty’s 333 Dexter office project in Seattle was designed for millennials, Skanska USA Commercial Development’s Alley 111 apartment in Bellevue has millennials in mind, and even Daniels Real Estate’s The Mark office/hotel tower in Seattle has elements that will attract the younger crowd.
Want to find out how these developers are designing their projects for those 20- and 30-somethings? Click here to check out the DJC’s latest special section covering urban development.

See what local firms can do with concrete

May 18th, 2015 by Ben

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The DJC’s annual special section on concrete is now available. Its focus is on award-winning projects by members of the Washington Aggregates & Concrete Association.

There’s also a great article by Melanie Cochrun of GLY Construction on how her firm used 600 workers to make two record-setting concrete pours earlier this year in Bellevue.

Check it out!

 

Check out what’s happening in the local construction scene

April 30th, 2015 by Ben

VWDealershipUDistrict

 

The DJC has published its annual Construction & Equipment special section. It’s a mix of industry articles, profiles of local award-winning projects and a few interviews with the contractors who make it all happen.

Read all about it at www.djc.com/special/construct2015

 

Washington students shine at CM competition

March 4th, 2015 by Ben
UWTeam

This UW team won first place in the Mixed Use category.

 

The University of Washington won three awards and Washington State University won one at the recently held regional Associated Schools of Construction student competition in Nevada.

The event is the largest construction management competition in the country, with more than 1,300 students from 44 universities and 17 states participating, according to a WSU news release.

Both schools competed in Region 7, which includes schools from Washington, Oregon, California and Hawaii.

UW won first place in the Region 7 Mixed Use category, and WSU was third in the Commercial category. UW also won two third place awards in the Open competition, in the Integrated Project and Sustainable Building/LEED categories.

Way to go kids!

WSUTeam

WSU’s winning team in the Commercial category.

 

 

 

 

See what’s trendy at the Seattle Home Show

February 10th, 2015 by Ben

SeattleHomeShow_AxiomDBHouse

Axiom Design Build, one of the exhibitors at the home show, raised this Queen Anne house onto a new foundation and added to the back.

 

The Seattle Home Show opens Saturday at CenturyLink Field Event Center.

Promoters of the 71st annual event put a list together of what is trending for the show. Here’s what they found:

  • More sophisticated laundry rooms, with formal space such as countertops to fold clothes.
  • Home styles moving in two directions: warm and rustic; sleek and modern.
  • White ceilings and muted walls.
  • Finishing extra space, such as over a garage or in a basement, for extended family or to rent out.
  • More homebuyers from foreign countries with extended families are creating more demand for bigger homes with multiple bathrooms.
  • Large walk-in showers are replacing bathtubs.
  • Older people are selling their homes to Gen Xers.
  • Baby boomers are downsizing from houses to condos, and are using equity to fix up their new digs.
  • Millennials are starting to enter the market and are looking for earth-friendly, smaller homes with more amenities.
  • Heated and covered outdoor living areas.
  • Outdoor kitchens, fireplaces and other luxury items.

Not trendy? The home show is holding an ugly couch contest, where the winner will get a $2,500 gift card from My Home Furniture & Decor.

The show runs until Feb. 22. Adults are $12, seniors $8 and juniors $3. Check it out at www.SeattleHomeShow.com.

Huge apartment fire blamed on maintenance and light-weight wood

January 23rd, 2015 by Tonia

 

apartment-building-fire

(This is the second fire at this complex since 2000 – while the project was under construction.)

EDGEWATER, N.J. (CBSNewYork) — Maintenance workers fixing a leak and using a torch is what started the massive fire at an Edgewater, N.J., apartment complex fire, officials said Thursday night.

As 1010 WINS’ Carol D’Auria reported, Edgewater police Chief William Skidmore said at a news conference the workers were using a blow-torch to make repairs to a leak at the Avalon at Edgewater complex, when a plumber accidentally ignited the fire in a wall.

Skidmore said the workers tried to put it out themselves and delayed calling for help for about 15 minutes. It is unclear how many workers were involved or where exactly the work was being done.

“They tried to suppress it themselves, and then they called their supervisor, which gave the fire a head start,” Skidmore said.

Fire Chief Thomas Jacobson said the delay in calling 911 put his crews at a disadvantage, WCBS 880’s Peter Haskell reported.

“It takes four minutes for a room to be fully engulfed and flash over so 15 minutes can make a big difference,” Jacobson said.

Officials also said Thursday a lightweight wood construction contributed to the fire, leaving hundreds of residents permanently displaced.

Edgewater Mayor Michael McPartland said a local state of emergency remains in effect due to the fire at The Avalon at Edgewater, which broke out around 4:30 p.m. Wednesday and raged for hours.

“It was a long and challenging night and I think every one of our first responders really stepped up to the challenge,” McPartland said.

McPartland said it was because of the good work of all the first responders that no lives were lost.

“I mean, I saw four brave men go into that fire and pull a woman out while the façade was coming down virtually on top of them,” he said.

The fire was brought under control by Thursday morning, but crews were still putting out hot spots and heavy smoke could be seen billowing from the structure even in the evening.

Jacobson said the fire appears to have started on the first floor and quickly spread through the floors and walls because of the building’s lightweight wood construction.

“If it was made out of concrete and cinder block, we wouldn’t have this problem,” he said, adding the building complied with construction codes.

Jacobson said the sprinklers were working and went off, but they were no match for these flames.

“It doesn’t get every area,” he said. “It gets the common areas where you can egress and get out. It gets your apartment. All the little voids inside every nook and cranny in the walls? No.”

Jacobson said crews simultaneously battled the fire while doing door-to-door searches and pulling people from the balconies.

“We had a crew trapped on the balcony with a victim; we had to rescue them with ground ladders from the back of the building. That was my concern first, not the building,” he said.

Firefighters from across New Jersey and from the FDNY helped battle the blaze. It was raised to more than five alarms Wednesday night and grew so large that the flames were visible from Midtown Manhattan.

As CBS2’s Sonia Rincon reported, the Bergen County Arson Squad investigated where and how the fire started, even though it later turned out to be accidental.

“A fire of this magnitude is an automatic response for the arson squad,” Skidmore said.

Schools were closed Thursday and will remain closed Friday. McPartland said access to some roads around the building would be restricted.

In all, 240 units were destroyed, permanently displacing about 500 residents, McPartland said. An additional 520 residents from other Avalon buildings have also been displaced, McPartland said.

“Don’t know where to even start,” resident Seoung Ju Won told CBS2’s Janelle Burrell.

“It was like a volcano eruption, really,” said resident Angela Nyagu. “That’s what I watched on TV before, how volcanoes erupt. Now I witnessed that myself.”

Among the residents of the complex was Yankees announcer John Sterling, who talked to CBS2 about his experience.

“I walked to the building and smelled smoke, and I went out to my floor where my apartment is, and the smoke was so bad I couldn’t see, and I thought, ‘Hey, we’d better get out of here,’” Sterling said.

And many residents, including Limor Yoskowitz-Frinomas, were still waiting to hear whether their homes were destroyed.

“We’re hoping for the best,” she said. “My kids are OK, so I’m OK, and we’ll take it from there.”

There were no reports of any missing persons, but McPartland said two civilians and two firefighters suffered minor injuries. He said some pets were rescued from the blaze, but some did die in the fire.

One woman told CBS2’s Meg Baker that her dogs were both killed.

“I saw gulfing flames coming out of the building, and unfortunately, I have two dogs that perished in the fire – Hailey and Griffin,” the woman said.

This isn’t the first time the very same apartment complex has been engulfed in flames.

In August of 2000, the complex was under construction when a fast-moving fire tore through it. The flames also destroyed a dozen surrounding homes, displacing up to 70 people.

The 2000 fire was ruled accidental by the Bergen County Prosecutor’s Office. No deaths or serious injuries were reported.

Video shows near miss at pontoon construction site

December 24th, 2014 by Ben

This week, the state Department of Labor & Industries cited Kiewit General Joint Venture for safety violations related to crane operations at the SR 520 bridge pontoon construction site in Aberdeen.

L&I says it started an inspection in June after a 13,000-pound concrete counterweight fell as it was being lowered from a Potain crane. The video below shows the incident where the falling concrete block just misses two workers as its cable snaps.

L&I is fining Kiewit General $170,500 for one serious and three willful violations. The charges include failure to follow several manufacturer’s recommended changes after being notified of problems with flawed or defective lifting lugs on the counterweights.

L&I also says Kiewit General did not follow the manufacturer’s recommendation to use alternative safety rigging on the counterweight.

News reports say Kiewit disagrees with the violations being called “willful” and may file an appeal.

Kiewit General in the spring expects to finish the last three of the bridge’s 21 longitudinal pontoons at the Aberdeen site.

The last of the smaller stability pontoons floated out of a Tacoma casting basin earlier this month. They were built by a joint venture of Kiewit, General and Manson.

CMU Firewall Saves Multi-Family Structure from Disaster

December 15th, 2014 by Tonia

photo 3A 50+ year old wood frame apartment complex in Airway Heights caught fire recently.

The structure is a dry wood frame, with a  CMU fire wall separating the building wings.  This building’s CMU fire wall prevented the adjoining wing from catching fire.  The front side of this structure received more damaged than the back which is shown in the photos.

This demonstrates the effectiveness of the CMU firewall component in multi-family and commercial structures.   The masonry industry works hard to continually reaffirm the use of CMU firewalls in buildings in condensed, urban areas to protect the community from major catastrophic fires as well as other energy, lifecycle and environmental factors.

The Masonry Institute of Washington is available to provide additional information on all masonry systems for both constructability and aesthetics.

In time for Thanksgiving, PCL donates $10K to local food banks

November 26th, 2014 by Ben

PCLFoodBank

PCL’s Seattle buildings and civil groups donated $5,000 to Northwest Harvest Food Bank and another $5,000 to Food Lifeline to support those in need. This is the sixth consecutive year the Seattle office has donated to the two food banks for a total of $60,000.

“Thanks to PCL for joining us in the fight against hunger,” said Linda Nageotte, president and CEO of Food Lifeline, in a release. “We see the need for food continue to increase especially among children and seniors, our most vulnerable populations.”

According to Food Lifeline, one in six Washington households struggled with food insecurity at some point during the year, meaning food was uncertain or unable to meet the daily needs of household members.

The checks were presented to the food banks on Nov. 20.

In addition to the Seattle office, 13 other PCL offices across the nation are donating $130,000 to local food banks.

Over the last six years, the company has donated $868,000 nationally. That’s about 7.8 million meals.

Way to go PCL!